Unboxing: Allied Tank Attack by InJoy Motion/Barron Games

arcadehero April 8, 2014 0

I didn’t exactly expect to do another unboxing so close to Transformers although in working out some details on a location test for a game, things just fell into place. As such I got my hands on the new Allied Tank Attack by InJoy Motion/Barron Games International. This is the same unit that was at Amusement Expo 2014, although I did have to wait a little bit on offering up this unboxing here due to a technical issue that arose in the shipment process, which caused a booting issue with the game when I got it. Fortunately the service that both InJoy and Barron offered was quick and I was able to get the game up and running. I also got some new software that is a change over what was at the Expo. I haven’t had a lot of time to see what the differences are – I know it has some timing changes so the operator can adjust how long the play is and the credits test is much more noticeable now. While writing this post a couple of people have played it and I caught some changes in the music, gameplay adjustments for showing objectives, more plants in the terrain, etc. I’ll have more time to get into that later – for the moment, here’s the unboxing:

(Right before that, if you want to see other arcade unboxing posts:  Transformers ; Batman; ReRave; Pac-Man Battle Royale; Friction ; Super Street Fighter IV )

Unfortunately for myself, when the game arrive I was alone and so I had to run between the truck and the arcade while people were coming into play some games. It was a little busier than usual for a weekday afternoon thanks to Spring Break vacation. Fortunately the UPS Freight driver was able to wheel the palettes in to the main lobby area of the arcade. The skinny box is the monitor side and the box to the right had the seat with the marquee hardware on top.

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While I was alone, the security staff at the mall was intrigued by this delivery much moreso than others I’ve had come in and they were able to help me get the pieces off each palette. Having the high ceilings was also a bonus in getting some of the cardboard off (without chopping it up into tiny pieces). The cardboard was thicker than I usually come across, the seat portion was on a cardboard palette of sorts. I would say you want about 3-4 people to get these off the palettes safely. Each piece was listed at weighing 400 lbs. Here’s the seat portion with the box above off and a layer of bubble wrap and shrink wrap to keep it safe.

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Ok I admit, this picture stinks, it was too close. A picture of us getting the cardboard off would have been nice but not possible since I and a guard slipped that portion up and off of the palette. This is where the high ceiling came in handy. This is the monitor portion with the cardboard off. It was wrapped up in quite the blanket of plastic, which is nice to see. One likes seeing the games protected when you unwrap them and most games are.

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Both sections off the palettes and ready for their unification. I also couldn’t get a picture of getting these off, since myself and three others had to work to safely get these onto the floor. This part of the process is always the most nerve-wrecking for me. Which is why you always get help and offer a free game afterwards. Actually we did stop a passerby and I gave him a couple of dollars worth of tokens to help us with one of the pieces. 😉

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There are a few cables that need to be attached. In addition to being keyed, they are all labelled on both ends. The monitor side is on the left, the seat on the right of the pic below. This uses an air compressor and air bags for the motion. There are bags that control the entire seat platform and one under the seat itself so it has slightly different feedback; it also has a couple of cables that go to the yoke controller for some force-feedback in the yoke. When everything is put together the units are much closer together than this, it was just easier to snap them this way. The metal plate that has the Caution sign on it is held in place with 4 Philips-head screws and ideally you pull the cables out, remove that cover, attach everything and then tuck them under this piece. Then they should be protected from any customer intrusion.

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Other assorted hardware including some spare cables and the marquee. I couldn’t snap a pic of me attaching the marquee but it wasn’t too difficult. I just needed a second person and a ladder. It uses a few strips of white LEDs to light things up.

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With that, it was ready to go. As mentioned there was a booting issue that had to be resolved first but with that and one other connection adjustment out of the way, it was pretty much good to go. I also had to move it around from where I had planned on having it – this thing pulls around 12 amps and its larger than most games so I had to move some games around physically and onto different circuits to accommodate it, but  that was an issue because of how full the arcade has become in the existing space.

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With this running a different software build than what was at Amusement Expo 2014, I will spend some time checking it out to see the difference but also see how a motion game works out in my arcade once again. The last time I tried a motion simulator was an overpriced Tsunami Tsumo cabinet that I picked up from a Vegas casino back in 2008. That was one of those lessons where I learned to spend more time researching used/second-hand costs from different sources before committing to buy. That unit did really well for about a month – then one of the six metal arms broke in half while someone was playing the game and I didn’t have the money to replace it. Eventually I parted the seat out and I use the monitor portion as a Friction kit (which has done really well).  As for where I hope to see it, if it can make about the same as the Tsumo I will be happy, otherwise I hope to see it competing with Blazing Angels. That game still does well six years later, its been one of the most consistent earning games I bought and its as close as I can put it since ATA doesn’t really fit into the racing or light-gun category.

 


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